ACCEPTED CONFERENCE PROPOSALS (WITH INDEXED PROCEEDINGS)


Business Communication with Text Mining and Social Network Analysis
(Accepted by e-Learning and Innovative pedagogies Journal - 11th International Conference, CG Publisher, March 2-3, New York, 2018). 

The idea behind this specific project is to develop instructional design techniques and the complete layout
of the pedagogical structure for an undergraduate English course on business writing and text mining for computer science majors. The major focus of this unique project was to understand the extent to which social networking analysis and basic text mining could be used successfully in an EFL business communication course for computer science students to understand business concepts. This paper explored how social networking software such as Gephi and Social Network Visualizer 2.3, besides other basic text mining tools such as Antconc could be used at a novice level to represent textual and procedural data on the use of technology, agents, agencies, and processes in the Silicon Valley (SV) start­up companies. There has been a prolonged discussion on how to replicate the Silicon Valley (SV) model of entrepreneurial culture in Japan. The Stanford New Japan project identified the challenges to initiate a globally game­changing localized version of the Silicon Valley culture in the Japanese context. The idea for this project was not only to focus on specific start­up companies in the Silicon Valley (SV) but rather understand how to make sense of textual data about some specific examples of SV business models in a logical and structured way.




Developing Corporate Mindset in an English Language Teaching Context
(Accepted by Education and Development Conference 2018 – March 3-5, Bangkok, Thailand)

Japanese universities are in a difficult situation as they struggle to enroll more foreigners and internationalize the student body and the campus environment (JapanTimes, 2010). One important aspect of such internationalization is to prepare students for a global workplace with adequate corporate awareness and exposure. Numerous universities in a worldwide context developed their own internship program to provide students with real-world experience of the products and the workplace environment. But, as has been experienced in this Japanese context for a prefectural computer science university, student motivation is lacking when it comes to venturing out to a foreign land to explore the unknown, and there are only a handful of students taking part in the Silicon Valley internship program. The idea then is to develop a pedagogical structure and plan for instructional design that promotes the culture of corporate exposure on campus for those students who are still not ready with a mindset that will likely take them to headquarters of world famous companies and start-ups such as Facebook, Google, Apple, Tesla etc., among other lesser known entities. This paper discussed the plan outline for developing a series of undergraduate elective courses in a computer science English language research center that addresses the issue of “exposure and corporate mindset” from the perspective of both product-based knowledge dissemination, and intercultural and organizational communication perspectives. The paper discussed how the courses has been laid out to teach both business and technical communication while making students aware of different organizations such as Apple, Tesla, Uber, Airbnb, the Tokyo start-up ecosystem, and the mindset that leads to the development of an entrepreneurial culture and mindset. The first semester electives have been designed to teach soft communication skills and develop corporate mindset in a business communication and text-mining environment. The second semester electives have been developed to teach product design and analysis in a technical writing and usability environment; and cultivate how products and ideas take shape in the Silicon Valley companies. Student reactions and course performance is beyond the scope of this paper as this is still a work in progress to be developed over 2017-2019 academic periods.


   
Preparing Data-Mining Framework for Business Writing in a Foreign Language Teaching Classroom
(Accepted by Asia-Pacific Conference on Education, Teaching & Technology 2018, January 25-26, Bangkok, Thailand)
This paper discussed preliminary ideas for a unique pedagogical approach in an undergraduate EFL (English as foreign language) business-writing course focused on textual data modeling for unclassified company information available on the web. The primary motivation behind such course design is to improve computer science students’ global understanding of the corporate scenario in the silicon valley and the Tokyo start-up ecosystem, and in the process develop students’ technical presentation skills and ability to persuasively drive home ideas, approaches and recommendations based on mind mapping and storyboarding software. Students’ ability to use such software now will be the foremost indication that they are in a position for future use of basic text mining (TM) and social networking analysis (SNA) software to make sense of unstructured text data. Preliminary data and class observation showed that computer science students were able to dissect text on various topics related to Japan’s start-up scene. Further, with multiple iterations and guided instructions, students were able to design concept maps, storyboards, and matrix demonstrating the interplay of various actors, processes, interactions, and measure frequency of contextually important terms. Following this test case, the next version of the same course would include data mining software such as Antconc, Network Visualizer 2.3 and social network analysis software such as Gephi. This test project provides the groundwork to run similar and yet advanced course assignments based on start-up company details.



TO BE SUBMITTED

    
    
ACM SIGDOC 2018 – Experience Report (Wisconsin, USA, August 3-5, 2018)
Experiencing Digital Manufacturing Processes in English Language Teaching

The new technologies of digital design and rapid prototyping have given everyone the power to invent (Anderson, 2012). Learning by making has a long established tradition in education, and thanks to 3D printing this educational principle makes a real comeback. Introducing 3D Printing into classrooms changes both the way students learn and the way educators teach (Sculpteo, 2015).
This project followed on the ideas of the maker revolution by involving students in 3D printing-based processes in an EFL (English as foreign language) project-based CALL (computer assisted language learning) environment and in a technical communication context. In this creative factory classroom, different technology interfaces and documentation platforms engaged students in complex technical writing activities and social interactions.
The purpose of this paper is to reflect on the advantages and disadvantages of using different interfaces, tools and software, identify the problems faced, and student perceptions developed with its use in such a complex project environment. The idea was to seamlessly combine technical communication with systems thinking, online research, 3D scanning, computer-aided design, sketch boarding and concept mapping, prototyping, and digital content management. The purpose of the paper is not to measure language acquisition, but to explore the experience with technology and coursework as the goal of language acquisition is pursued.
This paper reported on classroom experience and performance on project-based assignments to demonstrate how project-based CALL environment was created with different technologies synchronized towards exploring 3D printing-based practices. Both benefits and drawbacks of the 3D printing-based processes in language teaching has been discussed in the context of several parameters including (1) performance self-assessment on several tasks related to content management and delivery, and use of CAD software (2) perception about tasks such as working with LEGO; making product design with LeoCAD based on physical LEGO blocks; organizing webpage with pictures, screenshots and text; developing on existing design using Tinkercad software; using the 3D scanning apps; completing the project in a group – making the partners work together, group discussions, group participation, and group contribution (3) emotional assessment – class-related emotions, learning-related emotions and assignment-related emotions (4) parameters on how the team worked as a group for 3D printing related activities; and finally (5) using the usability questionnaire to judge student impression about using Tinkercad, IHMC concept mapping software, and use of Google Sites for webpage design.
Experience suggested that students were able to produce technical writing, prepare documentation, demonstrated critical thinking and brainstorming, and developed design and implementation strategies while handling 3D printing-enabled processes. Results and patterns of student engagement with technology indicated that project-based learning (PBL) approach in TC classroom was engaging, unique, realistic and feasible.
Finally, the paper highlighted the lessons learnt and how the next version of the course evolved out of the deficiencies of the current version. The paper discussed a sophisticated and balanced pedagogical approach for a similar 3D printing-based language course in the 2018-2019 academic years whereby several 3D printing-based start-up companies in Silicon Valley were discussed and explored towards document production and language acquisition, and overall understanding of project management.


   
ACM SIGDOC 2018 – Research Paper (Wisconsin, USA, August 3-5, 2018)
Thinking like an Entrepreneur: Reforming Japan’s English Education

Japanese universities are in a difficult situation as they struggle to enroll more foreigners and internationalize the student body and the campus environment (JapanTimes, 2010). The Japanese Ministry of Education’s English Education Reform Plan Corresponding to Globalization aims to address the problem head on. One important aspect of such internationalization is to prepare students for a global workplace with adequate corporate awareness and exposure. Numerous universities worldwide developed their own internship program to provide students with real-world experience of the industry and the workplace. But, as has been experienced in this Japanese context for a rising computer science university, student motivation was lacking when it came to venturing out to California, to gain some experience of how the SV industry functions. Ironically, only a handful of students participate in this Silicon Valley (SV) internship program where students are annually sent to the SV to gain experience of the entrepreneurial culture.
One potential solution then was to develop a pedagogical structure and plan for instructional design within the computer science curriculum that promotes the culture of entrepreneurial thinking on campus for those students who lacked intrinsic motivation and the mindset that will likely take them to the headquarters of world famous companies and start-ups such as Facebook, Google, Apple, Tesla etc., among other lesser known start-ups in Tokyo and/or SV. The idea for the course was to instill a model for language teaching that leads to the development of an entrepreneurial culture and mindset.
This paper explained the plan outline for developing a 4-course undergraduate elective coursework in a computer science English language research center that will likely address the issue of “exposure and corporate mindset” from the perspective of both product-based knowledge dissemination, and intercultural and organizational communication. The paper discussed how the courses has been laid out to teach business and technical communication, text-mining and usability testing methods while making students aware of the inner functioning of different organizations such as Apple, Tesla, Uber, Airbnb, and the Tokyo start-up ecosystem. The first semester electives were designed to teach soft communication skills in a business communication and text-mining environment. The second semester electives were developed to teach product design and analysis in a 3D printing focused technical writing and usability environment, besides cultivating how products and ideas take shape in the SV companies.
Initial data about student reactions and course performance in this trial period for this work in progress curriculum showed that students were positive about the SV-related courses, and they were able to complete the assignments successfully when the activities were contextualized for SV companies. They could start to relate the ideas and overall culture of the SV with their own future plans. Further, post-activity reflections showed relatively high motivation for the courses. Students showed interest in data-mining activities investigating SV companies, and usability analysis for innovative and futuristic products sold or considered for pre-production runs by SV companies. The paper also discussed approaches to seamlessly tie the four courses in a track so as to support the SV Internship Program.